The Natural Evolution Podcast

Season 1

Episode 7

S1E7 – I Didn’t Realize I Had A Concussion with Dr. Titus Chiu

I have taught with Dr. Titus Chiu many times before and it’s great to have a chat with him today about his healing journey.  He enjoyed traveling, but when he was living in Japan he was hit by a car while riding his scooter and was seriously injured.  After that, he tried everything conventional to ease his chronic pain.  A chiropractic adjustment from his brother set him on the path to functional healing and neurology.  What he didn’t realize until years later was that he had suffered a concussion in the accident.  He now works with patients going through the same brain trauma.

Dr. Titus Chiu is a #1 bestselling author, award-winning international speaker, and Functional Neurologist that helps high achievers go from surviving to thriving after a concussion, through online brain training programs, masterclasses, and immersive brain wellness retreats.

He is the #1 bestselling author of BrainSAVE! Dr. Chiu sees patients and private clients from all around the world both online and in-person at his brain centers in California.

Connect with Dr. Chiu:

Head over to https://rebelhealthtribe.com/kit to get a free download of our loaded quick start guide to help you along your healing journey.  If you like us, subscribe, review, and share us with your friends, and come join our Rebel Health Tribe group on Facebook.

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About our Guest

Dr. Titus Chiu is a #1 bestselling author, award-winning international speaker, and Functional Neurologist that helps high achievers go from surviving to thriving after concussion, through online brain training programs, masterclasses, and immersive brain wellness retreats.

He is the #1 bestselling author of BrainSAVE! Dr. Chiu sees patients and private clients from all around the world both online and in-person at his brain centers in California.

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S1E7_ I Didn_t Realize I Had A Concussion with Dr. Titus Chiu

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Podcast Transcript

Hello, and welcome to The Natural Evolution, produced by Rebel Health Tribe, a radio show focused on providing you with inspiration, education, and tools for true healing and transformation. I’m Michael, and I’ll be your guide on this adventure as together, we explore the very nature of the healing journey. We are live right now with Dr. Titus Chiu, Titus, man, thanks for doing this.

Titus Chiu:

Absolutely. Thanks for the invite. It’s always a pleasure chatting with you.

Michael:

Yeah, this is fun, and this time we’re not teaching anything. We’re just talking. It’s going to be a little more personal than normal, which is fun for me having these conversations. That’s what I love about the podcast is really helping the audience really get to know the people that they’ve spent time learning from on a lot of our stuff.

Michael:

A lot of our audience already knows you because we’ve done a lot of things together, but if you don’t, Dr. Titus Chiu is a number one bestselling author, award winning international speaker and functional neurologist that helps high achievers go from surviving to thriving after concussion through online brain training programs, master classes, and immersive brain wellness retreats.

Michael:

He’s the number one bestselling author of BrainSAVE!, and Dr. Chiu sees patients and private clients from all around the world both online and in person at his brain centers in California. You are now in Sacramento.

Titus Chiu:

Yep.

Michael:

It’s funny, I brought this up with Natasha. I think you guys moved away from Berkeley the week we moved to Berkeley.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah.

Michael:

Or it was within a-

Titus Chiu:

We were passing in the night.

Michael:

Yeah, it was quick enough that as soon as I got unpacked, you guys were the first people I messaged. It was like, “Hey, do you want to have lunch or something?” And you’re like, “Yeah, but I live in Sacramento now.”

Michael:

So, that’s what you do now. We’re going to have a little bit more conversation about how that came about. And so the first question I’m asking anybody who’s a doctor or health practitioner now, did you want to be a doctor when you grew up?

Titus Chiu:

No. I actually, the first thing I wanted to be was an astronaut. The second thing was a writer, and then through that process, as you know, through the car accident I was in and all the health problems I was dealing with, that’s when I really discovered my passion for the brain and natural health.

Titus Chiu:

But, that being said, because I was able to put my story-

Michael:

Yeah, you’re a writer.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, exactly, so-

Michael:

You got the writer part. We just need to get you into space.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, I’ve just got to call Elon Musk up and get up in there.

Michael:

I heard they’re recruiting people for the Mars mission now, so maybe they need [crosstalk 00:02:38] brain training on Mars.

Titus Chiu:

They may need a brain guy up there.

Michael:

They’re going to, I’m sure that’s going to be a rocky road for those folks.

Titus Chiu:

Exactly.

Michael:

So actually only one, so far, podcast guest actually grew up wanting to be a doctor. And the rest got into it due to necessity almost. And if not necessity, life experience that was drawing into pulling in that direction of I’ve been through this, and now it’s time for me to try to make something useful out of this and help other people.

Michael:

And I’ve seen that as such a recurring theme in this industry as a whole as I’ve gotten to know more and more practitioners that most professionals in this field have walked the line that the people that they’re helping are currently on.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, it’s been a wild ride, man. It definitely has.

Michael:

And so we talked a little bit before we were on air. You did an undergrad in biology, which has become useful at this point. Maybe not right away, but it was after you decided you wanted to go into functional medicine.

Titus Chiu:

Exactly.

Michael:

And the initial trainings probably weren’t quite as confusing to you as they were to some other people. But you spent time after college in Japan. And that’s where your healing journey cause happened. So can you share just a little bit about what that was like? I think you said you were teaching kids English in Japan. You were in your early mid-20s. What was that experience like living there and doing that?

Titus Chiu:

It was amazing. I’ve always loved traveling. I’ve always loved different cultures and food. But the interesting thing, I told you we were chatting about this. I hadn’t actually set out to go to Japan. After I finished up undergrad, like you said, I got a Bachelor’s in biology, and I was good at the scientific thought process, but I wasn’t really driven by anything. Nothing lit my fire.

Titus Chiu:

So I didn’t want to do research. At that time, I didn’t want to become a medical doctor. And so I decided to actually move to Taiwan because I wanted to learn Chinese. And so I ended up going out there and got a job, was teaching English out there. Two months into it, I was in a massive earthquake. I’m from Chicago, and it was like-

Michael:

Me too, man. We don’t have earthquakes.

Titus Chiu:

We don’t have earthquakes. We have snow. We have weather. We don’t, the earth doesn’t-

Michael:

Tornadoes.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, exactly.

Michael:

No earthquakes.

Titus Chiu:

And so it was terrifying. I’m pretty sure I had PTSD from that earthquake. So to make a long story short, I had a friend out there. We actually ended up moving to Japan. I had a friend living in Japan at the time, so we moved out there. But the ironic thing is we didn’t do much research, but after we moved out there, there was more seismic activity in Japan.

Titus Chiu:

I remember we got the job. I was out there at my friend’s apartment, and all of a sudden we’re just hanging out, things are finally okay. We got jobs, we’re good. All of a sudden the whole building goes like this, boom. It shakes, and then realizing yeah, Japan is actually more seismically active than Taiwan. And I was actually in four more earthquakes after that. So it was a wild ride.

Michael:

Then you lived here in California.

Titus Chiu:

And then I moved out here, yeah, exactly. So where’s my wood? Then you knock on wood, nothing bad so far.

Michael:

We had one last night. Mira woke me up quarter to five in the morning and said-

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, Lake Tahoe.

Michael:

“Hey, we just had an earthquake.” I was like, “Cool, sleeping.” And she was all freaked out. I looked it up this morning, it was 2.8 and it was centered in Oakland.

Titus Chiu:

Oh my goodness. Yeah, I didn’t hear about that. I heard about the Lake Tahoe one recently, so.

Michael:

So not big, but 2.8 if you’re close enough to the epicenter, you’ll notice it.

Titus Chiu:

You’ll feel it, yeah.

Michael:

But the first one, man, is a trip. Your first one was the big one in Taiwan?

Titus Chiu:

It was 7.6-

Michael:

Holy shit.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah. I think 8 is when the world begins to implode.

Michael:

Yeah. No, I’ve only felt a 3. I’ll stick with 3.

Titus Chiu:

We were 30 miles from the epicenter, and it was… Yeah, it was terrifying. But yeah, to make a long story short, we ended up in Japan, and it wasn’t even that I had so much fascination about Japanese culture. I ended up falling in love with the people and the food, the culture, the art. Everything out there was just, yeah… It was an amazing experience, for sure.

Michael:

Everyone I know who’s ever spent time living in Japan has said exactly the same thing.

Titus Chiu:

Awesome.

Michael:

And Mira’s folks, her Dad’s wish of his life, was to travel to Japan. And two years ago they finally went.

Titus Chiu:

Nice.

Michael:

He spent like six months taking Japanese lessons here so that he could actually… He said he didn’t get very far with it, but he got enough to where he could do the basics of greeting people and asking for things and responding to basic questions. And they had a blast. They had the time of their life. They loved it so much.

Titus Chiu:

Nice.

Michael:

And they want to go back.

Titus Chiu:

Did they go to the traditional inns, the ryokans?

Michael:

They did with the bath. You get the bath and then you get the dining in the robes. They would eat in their robes after the bath because they don’t want you to put on your scummy clothes-

Titus Chiu:

Exactly.

Michael:

… after you take the bath. You have to be clean. And they would always… They were biking a lot, and the people would insist because they didn’t understand it. A couple of times they were like, “No, no, we can just eat now.” And they were like, “No, you should have a bath. We insist you-” And then they realized later it’s because we stunk, and they didn’t want us in their restaurant. But yeah, they loved it. They loved it, and the pictures were amazing, and it’s definitely on my list.

Titus Chiu:

So I do speak both Chinese and Japanese now.

Michael:

Okay.

Titus Chiu:

But I wanted to become fluent.

Michael:

Okay.

Titus Chiu:

Learning a language growing up, my parents spoke Chinese, so I have the neural networks for it.

Michael:

Like Mandarin?

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, Mandarin. But then the actual execution of it, the connection with the other part of the brain that deals with the expression of language, that wasn’t as well formed.

Michael:

Gotcha. Cool.

Titus Chiu:

But yeah, ironically I ended up learning probably… Yeah, I was able to communicate better in Japanese than Chinese. So yeah, it was definitely a wild ride.

Michael:

I wonder if there’s research on one’s ability to heal from brain injuries and other brain issues if they speak multiple languages.

Titus Chiu:

Not in terms… I haven’t seen research in terms of healing ability, but I’ve seen a lot of research in terms of, for example, prevention. There’s lower risks for different types-

Michael:

Degenerative diseases?

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, exactly. And I’ve seen more rather than related to disease, it’s more like when you train your brain through being multilingual or bilingual, you’re training these areas of the brain that deal with executive function but also creativity and all these things. So a lot of things happen in the brain. It’s pretty cool too. It’s funny because I speak English, obviously. I’m still working on that one, though. And then Spanish, Chinese, and Japanese.

Michael:

So you were there, and it was a car accident that started your journey. You mentioned a few minutes ago, a car accident, but you also mentioned health issues. Were you in Japan having health issues, or did that come after the car accident, or what was the sequence there?

Titus Chiu:

Yes, the answer is yes.

Michael:

Yes.

Titus Chiu:

Even before the car accident I was in, I struggled with a lot of health issues, but they weren’t “diseases,” I got sick all the time, as an example. I would always just get sick, and I thought I was just weak, my body. I used to have issues with motivation and depression and skin issues. I had all these just mild symptoms that weren’t devastating to me, but they definitely impacted my quality of life. But because I didn’t understand health and the brain, I just chalked it up as Titus. This was who I am.

Michael:

Yeah.

Titus Chiu:

So I definitely had those issues prior, but then after the car accident, which led to the concussion and chronic pain, that’s when it developed more severe neurological symptoms.

Michael:

So that was in Japan that that happened?

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, the car accident was in Japan, but the funny thing was immediately after the car accident, the biggest health issues weren’t neurological. I was just dealing with chronic pain because I dislocated my shoulder, and I was thrown from my motorbike like 10 feet through the air, and so I was dealing with chronic neck and-

Michael:

Your car accident was a motorbike accident?

Titus Chiu:

I was on a scooter, yeah, and I got hit by a car.

Michael:

Oh.

Titus Chiu:

And I still remember that day. I remember-

Michael:

That changes things because I saw the picture you put of the car.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah. No, I was-

Michael:

And I was surprised you got as injured as you did looking at the car, but if I knew you were on a motorbike that hit that car, that’s a different story.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, no, I didn’t hit the car. The car hit me.

Michael:

Yeah.

Titus Chiu:

he came out of nowhere. She was making this turn, and I was going through, and bam, she hit me from the side, and I flew like 10-15 feet through the air. And I remember in my mind’s eye, I remember there was a guardrail. If I had been thrown into the guardrail, I wouldn’t be here today. You know?

Titus Chiu:

So my point is through all that the immediate thing that was healing-

Michael:

Yeah, bodily injuries.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, exactly. I had shoulder and neck pain. I had broke three ribs. It was difficult to breath. But thank God I survived, but then through that I ended up with chronic pain. I had to deal with that because although I was taken to the ambulance and to the ER, they’re like, “Oh, everything’s fine. We ran the X-rays. There’s no danger now.” So then they just discharged me and let me go. You know?

Titus Chiu:

But then from there, I wasn’t given any exercises to do, any types of treatments to help with the soft tissue injuries. And so the most immediate thing for me after that was dealing with the chronic pain. But the strangest thing was once I was actually… I told you, I went to see my brother because I tried everything within conventional medicine for that pain, and nothing worked.

Titus Chiu:

When I came back to the United States for vacations, I’d go to doctors again. So I saw him when I was on break from working. I was back in the United States in Chicago, and he adjusted me, and after just three sessions, that pain was dramatically decreased. And I’m like, “Oh my God, there’s something to this.”

Titus Chiu:

And I actually didn’t develop “concussion symptoms” until probably three or five years after the car accident. Either I was probably developing them slowly, but I didn’t realize the amount until it reached a boiling point, and I hit rock bottom and had a complete breakdown pretty much.

Michael:

So your brother, older brother?

Titus Chiu:

Yeah.

Michael:

He’s a chiropractor.

Titus Chiu:

Mm-hmm (affirmative)

Michael:

Okay, and so you’re visiting, got the adjustments, felt better. How long had it been from the accident until your first a-ha moment with him and the adjustments?

Titus Chiu:

I’d have to say it was over a year because I was in Japan, and I’d come back to the United States about once a year to visit friends and family. So it was probably either a year, maybe even over a year because-

Michael:

That whole time you were dealing with these pain issues?

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, I was dealing with this chronic pain. It was a lot of things I loved to do… When I was in Japan, I was exercising. I was working out a lot. I couldn’t do that anymore. And I loved skateboarding, and I was able to skate still, but I had to be careful because once you dislocate your shoulder, for those of you who’ve done that before, unless you actually get treatments to restabilize the-

Michael:

Yeah, it can happen again really easily, right?

Titus Chiu:

… the cerebellum and the brain. Yeah, it can happen really easily. So a lot of the things that I was doing for enjoyment or just stress relief, like exercise, which is really important to me, I wasn’t able to do. So it was really hard, and I was just dealing. I had never had chronic pain prior to that. I’ve had injuries growing up skateboarding or whatnot, but I tend to bounce back. But that was a really serious accident.

Michael:

Hey, if you’re enjoying this show, make sure you head over to rebelhealthtribe.com/kit, that’s K-I-T, and grab the RHT starter kit, which includes a sampler of four free videos from our professional masterclasses and webinars, the RHT Healthy Sleep Guide, the Wellness Vault coupon book, which will save you money on all of our favorite health-related tools and resources, a professional product guide, and a coupon for 15% off your first order in our shop. That’s rebelhealthtribe.com/kit, K-I-T, and you’ll get all that delivered right away.

Michael:

Also, if you’re on Facebook, we’ve got a fun, engaging, and supportive group over there as well with thousands of health seekers just like yourself. Just search for Rebel Health Tribe, and you’ll find us. Thanks for listening, and now back to the show.

Titus Chiu:

And so it was probably about a year, year and a half, after that original car accident. I grew up in a family of medical doctors and within conventional medicine. I’m like, “Ah, what is that stuff?” But then nothing I tried worked within conventional medicine, so I’m pretty sure that’s how it happened. The following time, the visit-

Michael:

So you got an I told you so on you.

Titus Chiu:

Pretty much. He offered it again. I’m like, “Okay.” And it’s so funny because I have so many patients who come when they work with me, they’re just like, “Okay, I’ve tried everything. I’ll try anything at this point.” And that’s kind of what my mindset was. I tried all this stuff in conventional medicine and nothing worked. I’m like, “Okay, I guess I’ve reached the end of it.”

Michael:

Yeah.

Titus Chiu:

But the interesting thing was it wasn’t even the end of it, it was the beginning of this entire journey of discovery with natural medicine and chiropractic and functional medicine and functional neurology. It was like a whole world opened up for me after he did that adjustment, and then I’m like, “Wow, I need to learn this.”

Titus Chiu:

And so I went back to school and just exposed myself to as much as I could learn about all of that. It was just such an exciting time. And I still love that, the learning process of it.

Titus Chiu:

So he had done the adjustment, and like I said, I literally remember that day. I think he had treated me about two or three times, and I think we were just at our parents’ house. And he set up this portable table, and he was doing all these muscle testing and stuff. I’m like, “What is this stuff?” But then I remember this one adjustment he did to my neck, and I just felt it. Something shifted.

Titus Chiu:

And it’s so interesting because when I look back on it now, definitely it was something shifted neurologically because that’s how chiropractic works, by the way. And something shifted with the biomechanics of it. But when I look back on it now, something changed in my life because honestly Michael, I didn’t really talk about this much, but when I was in Japan, it was a dark time even before the concussion.

Titus Chiu:

I was drinking like crazy. I had really terrible lifestyle habits. It was just a very dark time honestly. So when I look back on it now, it’s like oh my God, that adjustment, it didn’t just change my neurology and my biomechanics and the pain, it literally changed the trajectory of my life. You know?So in many ways, that adjustment and my brother, he really just shifted things for me.

Michael:

So that full year in Japan, before that, you had pain in your neck and your shoulder that was pretty chronic, and you were dealing with depression, unhealthy lifestyle.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah.

Michael:

Yeah, I can relate. My whole 20s are kind of a blur. So-

Titus Chiu:

Exactly.

Michael:

… of like depression and drinking. I was in the service industry, and I can imagine that did not help your healing process from the crash.

Titus Chiu:

No.

Michael:

But then the crash and being immobilized or unable to do things you like, then that further feeds into the depression, which leads to more of the lifestyle habits, which then makes you less able to heal, and then it’s this cycle that can continue.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, it was a vicious, vicious cycle. And honestly, it wasn’t like after the adjustment all that changed. I still had to face a lot of my demons through the whole healing process. And that was part of my recovery from the concussion as well. Like I was saying, when things really reached a head, it had started around that time of that car accident. So I can look back on it now and be like, “Oh yeah, my behavior started already change after that.” Right?

Michael:

And then the car accident’s what started to get you in line a little. It sounds cliché, but I’ve been through some pretty rough stuff the last three or four years with Mira’s health and our life and catastrophe and all kinds of things, and I’ve noticed if you don’t listen-

Titus Chiu:

Oh yeah.

Michael:

… they turn up the volume a little bit, and then if you’re not listening then, it becomes a shout, and if you’re not listening then, it becomes a major health crisis or an injury or something. And things will happen that are not along those lines. I don’t want to turn into a victim blaming situation, but-

Titus Chiu:

Yes, sure, there are signs. I firmly believe that.

Michael:

Yeah.

Titus Chiu:

There’s signs that our body and our brains give us. But I have to say again, when I look back on it, it’s like there were signs from the universe. One of the biggest lessons I’ve learned from all of that, honestly, is just like you said, is paying attention to that more. And then having that feedback and making adjustments way before I end up in the red again. I never ever want to end up where I was in those dark days of my recovery ever. So that’s one of the biggest things I try to teach my patients too is the long game of the recovery. There’s these different stages of that journey. It’s like you’re in the red when you’re really experiencing the symptoms and the suffering. And then you get out of it and then things feel better, but if the deeper stuff, the foundational stuff isn’t really set in place, then you just end up right where you started. This roller coaster that I used to go through. So it wasn’t like-

Michael:

It’s not going to be linear. It’s not just like ding, ding, ding, ding, ding.

Titus Chiu:

Oh no. Yeah, it’s not linear. There’s definitely these ups and downs, but what I’ve learned, there’s patterns. Right? There’s a framework and there’s actually a road map that through my experiences and working with thousands of patients, I know what those pitfalls are, and I help people avoid them. Because that’s the thing, that’s the last thing I ever want anyone to end up. Or if they are in those places, get them out of there as soon as possible, but then build the solid structures and the foundations for that long term healing, the deeper healing.

Titus Chiu:

So yeah, it’s been quite a wild ride, but I like how you put it, Michael. There are signs. There are things, whether we can speak esoterically in the universe in our lives, or even very simply within our own bodies and nervous systems. There are symptoms, that’s what the symptoms are. They’re there to tell us something.

Titus Chiu:

And I’ve found that when I listen sooner. Right? So okay, Titus, it’s time to go to bed. Wrap up your work. And it’s time to make sure you get some down time. When I listen sooner rather than later, then it’s like I stay in that space of optimal health versus just putting out fires.

Titus Chiu:

I’ll have to say that’s one of the, at least in my part, the stage and the journey of my healing I’m at right now. That’s one of the biggest lessons for me is the sooner you can listen to that feedback, honor your body’s needs and take action, or in many cases take inactions so you’re not overworking or overdoing things. That’s when you prevent those big setbacks and the crashes.

Michael:

Sure, and you mentioned the brain symptoms, the concussion TBI-type symptoms from the crash came later, so you had the pain. The pain got better with the adjustments. You were like, “I need to do this.” You eventually moved back from Japan to go to chiropractic school. Went through chiropractic school, probably opened a chiropractic practice of some kind or were working somewhere, and then things started to come on? Because you said three to five years. I don’t know how long chiropractic school is.

Titus Chiu:

So it’s interesting. Again, when I look back on retrospect, I’m pretty sure even immediately after the accident, there were changes in my behavior. Right? And I was doing the best I could. And I have compassion for-

Michael:

We mentioned depression and stuff, but brain injuries don’t help that.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, exactly. It was like motivation issues, depression, but also a lot of anger issues. And I think I buried that with the alcohol, honestly. But it got worse. At one point I look at it, it’s like, oh yeah, I went to Japan. I’d just finished undergrad, first time I had freedom. I was an adult. I had my own job. I was paying my bills and doing all that. You know? And so part of it I look at it, yeah, it was free, a lot of free time and freedom. And I was partying. I was hanging out and enjoying life.

Titus Chiu:

But I think if I look back on it now, it was after that car accident, something shifted. There was just a different energy to it, if you know what I mean.

Michael:

Yeah, I had depression too, and I’ve had between four and six concussions in my life, so.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, exactly. And so when I look back now, there were early signs. Right? And I’m able to do so because that’s what I do for my patients and clients is look. I explore history. At one point, fast forward, when I hit rock bottom, I’m like what is going on? These issues that I was dealing with, the anger and the paranoia and just not being able to handle stress and brain fatigue, brain fog, all that stuff and vertigo, I never had these symptoms growing up.

Titus Chiu:

I described it before, I had some brain fog. I had some mild depression and some motivation issues, but it never impacted my life to such a degree.

Titus Chiu:

So it wasn’t until, yeah, I would have to say it was just slow growing of a time, but then just a few years ago, things completely fell apart in my life. And it was really interesting too because on one level professionally, everything was going really well. I was flying all over the world teaching about neurology. I had a successful clinic, and I was helping a lot of people, but my own personal life was totally falling apart.

Titus Chiu:

And part of it was the addictions I was still struggling with and dealing with. But then once things hit rock bottom, I realized I need to make a change here. You know? And so through that process, that’s when I began to really take things seriously.

Titus Chiu:

That’s the thing. When I look at it, I had made some changes to my health over time, and it’s a journey. It’s a total journey, but it wasn’t until that just completely, that breakdown I had. I’m like, “Things really need to change.” And I think that’s when I started facing the deeper demons that had come out from that whole concussion experience, and that’s when deeper healing happened.

Titus Chiu:

Not only was I doing things to improve my physiology through supplements and having a relatively healthy diet, but I started exploring the more spiritual aspects of the healing journey. And so for me it’s been this, like I said, this entire process, this journey. And I feel, again knock on wood here. I feel in a really good place.

Titus Chiu:

But don’t get me wrong, it wasn’t always like this. There were moments in that where I felt like giving up. I felt so hopeless and discouraged. And I know a lot of people out there who are struggling with their health. That’s part of the journey. There’s always these stages that you’ll go through in that healing process, and it’s so important to have that understanding that you are in that stage and that empathy and compassion for yourself because that was one of the biggest things for me was being so hard on myself along that way. Where now after going through it, I’ve realized that there were these milestones in that, that are even though everyone’s unique, and we all have our journeys, there’s very common patterns that I see.

Titus Chiu:

So there’s a lot that we can do to help ease the pain and the suffering in whatever part of that journey you are in. And it’s interesting because each of those different phases requires a slightly different approach. It’s different mindset, different types of even practical actions we take, like health actions. But I’ve learned working with so many patients and going through it myself, to be able to help guide a person whatever stage they are in that process, because people need different messaging at some times. You know?

Michael:

Yeah, for sure.

Titus Chiu:

It’s not going to always land because I can imagine myself now talking to myself 20 years ago after this car accident and when I was dealing with all that stuff. And if I had just approached it and be like, “Oh you just need to do this, this, and that.” The old Titus would be like, “Whatever, dude. I don’t know who you are.” So I’ve learned because going through that, yeah, there’s these different stages that require a different type of nurturing along the way. Sometimes you need some tough love, sometimes you don’t. You just need someone to understand what you’re going through.

Michael:

Yeah, and it’s not wrong either way. My journey’s really similar to that. It was gradual and then there was a collapse, like everything falls apart moment where it’s like this has to change. You have to address this. These things need to happen because this is not what I want my life to be. And so for me, it took turning the volume up on the signals to get my attention enough to where it was either this or I don’t know if I’m going to live anymore.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah.

Michael:

And one way or another, that’s where a lot of people get. And it did feel hopeless. It does feel like there’s a mountain in front of you, and it’s impossible to do all the things that you need to do. And the cool part is you don’t need to do them all at once.

Titus Chiu:

Nope.

Michael:

I used to give my clients a zillion page thing of all the things that I wanted them to do. Like right now, just do these 107 things, just change your entire life upside down tomorrow. You’re going to feel great, I promise. And I never understood why they didn’t do it. And I’d wonder-

Titus Chiu:

It’s overwhelming, yeah.

Michael:

Had one woman ever go home, she gave away all her food. She bought all new food. She bought some other health-related tools and gizmos that I recommended. She came back to me in two weeks and had done 90% of the list all at once, and it stuck. And she nailed it and her life changed and all these things happened. Literally once. I’ve seen that happen one time exactly. Usually when people would try to do all the things-

Titus Chiu:

It’s overwhelming.

Michael:

They would fail at the things and then quit all the things. I then learned to adjust my recommendations based on where they were at and give them, “Do these three things or don’t do these three things,” or whatever the thing is, but it does feel daunting. And so what was your a-ha moment with neurology? When did the brain become the focus of your attention? Was it during that collapse period, and you started to learn about the brain, or was there a presentation you watched, or a patient that you met? What was it that snapped that on, it was like this is my jam and I’m going to do this?

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, it’s so fascinating because when I think about that, in chiropractic school, I absolutely loved neurology. In undergrad I might have had one or two courses. I don’t even think so. It was like I had general courses, and part of it was about neurology. But in chiropractic school, the training. At least the school I went to, deep training in the sciences, and neurology was a big one. I absolutely just fell in love with learning it. But the interesting thing was I’m like, “Well, how am I ever going to be able to apply this information? I’m a chiropractor.” Right?

Titus Chiu:

But then as I got deeper into it, I actually went to a seminar, a functional neurology seminar. It was a weekend seminar, and the guy the teacher, he was showing us how we can use neurology incorporating it into your chiropractic practice and more importantly, how chiropractic really is, it’s a form of neurology. When you adjust the spine, when you move the body, that activates very specific neural networks that target the nervous system.

Titus Chiu:

There’s studies that show that the chiropractic adjustment activates the cerebellum and the prefrontal cortex, which cerebellum’s involved with balance, coordination, but also immune function, autonomic function. And the prefrontal cortex, as many of you guys probably know, deals with executive functioning, like our ability to stay focused and present in our lives, and be discerning. Right? From chiropractic, it works through the nervous system.

Titus Chiu:

So that’s when things really clicked for me where it was this intellectual love for neurology. And then when I went to that seminar, I was shown how to actually apply it, it just blew my mind. I’m like, oh my God, this is how I can use that to further heal my brain and to bring this to my patients and help them heal there’s.

Titus Chiu:

And so it was almost like in the Matrix you take that pill and you start seeing the zeroes and ones.

Michael:

Yeah.

Titus Chiu:

I take that pill and neurology helped me see the framework underneath all these more esoteric therapies within chiropractic and all these different techniques out there, which is cool. A lot of these techniques that are gaining more ground these days in psychology even, like psychoendoneuroimmunology and tapping and all this. They all work through the nervous system. And so it was really interesting for me because all of a sudden I had the framework to understand what made me tick, what made my patients tick, and then if I was working with a patient and I would try doing a protocol I learned in the seminar and it didn’t work, then I knew how to work around it and create my own protocols because I understood the science behind it.

Titus Chiu:

So that for me was a turning point. But honestly, the interesting thing, Michael, wasn’t like I needed to learn neurology to heal my concussion. Because I didn’t even realize I was dealing with a concussion.

Michael:

Yeah, you didn’t even realize that that was happening.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, I was just like, “Wow, this stuff is amazing.” It’s a beautiful way of understanding the universe, and at least ourselves and others. And on a very practical level how to help my patients. And then from there, it was like when I dove deeper into neurology, I began to specialize in neurology even in student clinic, and then when I went out into practice, I started seeing more patients that had neurological issues. And I would do the different protocols, and they would get better. Right?

Titus Chiu:

But then there was this subset of patients that I worked with that no matter what I did, they wouldn’t respond. And so I took a deeper dive and I realized a big percentage of that subset of these people, my patients, they had a history of concussions. And so I knew there was something there. So I dove deeper into the world of concussion itself because with neurology, it’s a big field. There’s so many different things you can focus on.

Titus Chiu:

So when I took a deep dive into the world of concussion and explored the ins and outs of that, I would bring it back to my patients, apply it, and then their lives would improve. And then for me, I love not only learning the stuff, but also applying it to my own health. And so I would experiment with these more advanced concussion therapies and approaches, and a lot of those symptoms that I had developed like the more concussion systems, so to speak, after that car accident began to improve. And all of a sudden, this new light bulb went off. I’m like, “Oh my goodness. I’m pretty sure I suffered a concussion and that I had post-concussion syndrome.”

Titus Chiu:

It was the wildest thing. It was because here I am, I was a functional neurologist, and I didn’t realize-

Michael:

You didn’t realize you had concussion syndrome.

Titus Chiu:

I had a concussion. And so it was through that process-

Michael:

So don’t feel bad out there if you haven’t gotten it all figured out yet. He was a doctor.

Titus Chiu:

Exactly, and I definitely don’t either. We had a lot of discoveries and discovered a lot of principles and secrets to healing from a concussion.

Michael:

So what happened? Your mood got better and your focus improved. What was your signs to yourself that, “Oh, I probably had a concussion syndrome.”? Because a lot of people have said this too that they didn’t realize even Dr. Natasha, who is Titus’s wife, and she’s on another episode of this season. She said she didn’t realize that she had been sick the whole time until she felt good.

Titus Chiu:

Exactly.

Michael:

And it was like, “Wow, what is this weird thing?” And then realized, “Oh, I was sick that whole time.” So what kind of changes happened where you started to realize I was dealing with a concussion from my crash?

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, so the initial stuff that got better was these vertigo symptoms that I would have. So vertigo, for those of you out there who aren’t aware, is just a perception or sensation that things are moving when they’re actually not. Either you are moving or the room, the world is moving. So I started to develop these vertigo events out of nowhere. And it’s terrifying.

Titus Chiu:

I’d be hanging out at a restaurant or something, sitting at the bar and eating my tacos. And all of a sudden the whole room would go like this, voomp. Like it just moved diagonally, and I’d almost fall out of my chair because I thought yeah, I didn’t even know what was going on. And so-

Michael:

And that can trigger your earthquake flashbacks.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, exactly. I’m in Chicago a lot-

Michael:

Like it was just for you. Why is this restaurant moving?

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, but the earthquake was up and down, side to side. This was counter-clockwise. I’m like wait, am I in a fun house or something? So it was terrifying though because it just would come out of nowhere. And so those are some of the first symptoms that got better were more the physical ones. But that’s the thing. Then I started piecing things together. Even though I was doing these things, it wasn’t like everything was night and day shift. Some things improved. Number one was because I still didn’t really fully understand that I had the concussion. But number two was just I didn’t still take it that seriously honestly.

Titus Chiu:

And again, going back to what we were talking about earlier, it wasn’t until I hit rock bottom then I’m like, “Oh my goodness, that’s what was happening.” The same thing that I see so many patients that they went through or they are going through, I was going through. So once that happened and then I started really taking things seriously.

Titus Chiu:

Again, it was just that I had to wait until the volume got turned up way loud, which is part of the learning process. And so that’s when I realized yeah, number one most yeah, I’m pretty sure a lot of these more severe psychological neurological symptoms were not only due to that car accident, but really shook, things were shaken up then.

Titus Chiu:

Because actually even after that car accident, I had several other head injuries afterwards. Not as severe as that definitely, but-

Michael:

That must go along with drinking, I’ve noticed.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, exactly. No, it’s true.

Michael:

Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Titus Chiu:

Actually, research shows that when you do drink, like binge drinking, it triggers the same neuro-inflammatory response in your microbial cells than if you had a concussion.

Michael:

Oh really?

Titus Chiu:

Yeah. And that’s the fascinating thing about concussion. Everyone thinks, “Oh, I’ve never had a concussion.” Number one, you don’t even need to have a physical trauma to your head. You can be in a car accident where you head just gets shaken about. But number two, emotional traumas can trigger the same inflammatory reaction in your brain. So can binge drinking alcohol. So can lack of sleep. So can over training and exercising.

Titus Chiu:

So there’s all these things that build up over time that again, when I look back now, it’s just like oh my God, if there was a checklist, I would have checked off probably 95% of those. That’s why-

Michael:

It’s almost like someone taught me to how to mess up my brain and then I was a really good student at it.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, exactly, I was a very good student. I was top of my class.

Michael:

I could do that and this. I’ll do them at the same time.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, all at the same time. And so yeah, that’s why now when I work with clients and patients, I’m just like, “Oh man, we’ve got to look at the long game, the big picture.” But just we were discussing earlier, Michael, I always break it down and meet them wherever they’re at in that process. It’s like, okay, there might be a million things that you might need to do, but guess what, here’s the top three or here’s the top five that will move the needle for you the most. And many times because everything’s connected, if you just focus on those, you probably won’t have to end up doing the rest of the 20-

Michael:

Part makes doing the other things easier too.

Titus Chiu:

Exactly.

Michael:

Because your capacity to make changes. I didn’t really fully understand the state of overwhelm that some of my clients were in when I would work with them until Mira got really sick and was in a really, really bad flare with her autoimmunity and was in tons of pain. And we were in full blown crisis every morning every day. That I would have conversations with practitioner friends of mine who were trying to help us out. And they would ramble off a bunch of stuff that I was supposed to do and labs to run and things, and it’s stuff I usually would have been able to just make mental notes of and then take away and go do it. I would get off the phone and be like, “Man, I’ll feel really bad for this, but I need to call them back because I don’t know what they just said.”

Titus Chiu:

Exactly.

Michael:

Because I was in a panicked state, and that causes neuro-inflammation.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, it’s just like we were talking about earlier, that viscous cycle. But the cool thing is, again, what I learned through all of that, healing my own brain, going through the different stages of that journey, working with thousands of patients and private clients is various access points, specific access points, like leverage points depending on where you’re at in that journey. So sometimes you can do just three things that can really shift.

Titus Chiu:

That’s actually when I started out in all of this as a functional neurologist. I always was trying to figure out what are those leverage points for that person? What can I do or contribute to a situation where you just need to blow on it and things start to fall into place? You know what I mean?

Michael:

Yeah, move the needle and start a momentum.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah.

Michael:

Yeah.

Titus Chiu:

And what I’ve discovered, because that’s always been a question in my mind. It’s like I was always trying to figure out number one, how can we help someone heal the fastest? Right? But then number two, the way we do that is figuring out what these leverage points are. And it’s unique to each person, but like I said, there’s a framework, there’s a road map to healing from a concussion. And depending on where they’re at in those journeys, and then depending on their story that overlapped with that, then those key leverage points pop up. And sometimes you just need a few simple things that can completely change the story for a person.

Titus Chiu:

That’s what’s always drawn me to continuing my research and studying about the brain and concussion and all the facets of healing from it. It’s an endless journey of discovery for me, which is why I absolutely love it.

Michael:

Well more you can see the Matrix numbers, the faster you can probably make those connections for people too.

Titus Chiu:

And then you eventually realize that there are no zeroes or ones. That’s when-

Michael:

There is no spoon.

Titus Chiu:

There is no spoon.

Michael:

Cool, well I had one question I wanted to ask that I don’t think I remembered to. It’s a little out of order, but I’m interested, so I want to know.

Titus Chiu:

Sure.

Michael:

How much of the, it was a scooter, you were on a scooter, got hit by a car. How much of it do you remember?

Titus Chiu:

Oh my God.

Michael:

Do you remember it like very vividly? The whole thing?

Titus Chiu:

Very vividly. I don’t remember… Like there’s some people who can remember events like a movie, as if watching a movie. I remember pieces very vividly of that whole thing. I remember driving because there was a green light, and I was on my way to work. And I was driving because cars were parked at the stop light. But there was a green, so I was going along, but there was traffic. So I was going along the side, and in Japan they drive on the opposite side of the road as in the States. So she was coming, and she made a right hand turn, and then because I was coming along the side and cars were parked, I didn’t see her coming. And then bam. And then from there, I just remember flying through the air, hitting the ground, and I actually got winded. Right? I got the wind knocked out of me. And I’ve never had that happen.

Michael:

That is the most uncomfortable.

Titus Chiu:

Terrifying.

Michael:

Oh my God. It happened to me when I was 9 in intermural basketball. I jumped up, somebody undercut me, and I landed on my back on the ground. I thought it was over. I was done.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, it was over. I thought-

Michael:

I’m going to die right here.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, I thought I’d pierced my lungs.

Michael:

Yeah.

Titus Chiu:

I literally thought I was going to die.

Michael:

Oh man.

Titus Chiu:

It was terrifying. So I remember that.

Michael:

That was when you hit the ground and then it was you couldn’t breathe?

Titus Chiu:

I couldn’t breathe for I don’t know how long. Probably-

Michael:

It seems like a year. It was probably a minute or two.

Titus Chiu:

Too long. Too long without the ability to control my diaphragm.

Michael:

Yeah.

Titus Chiu:

Then once I caught my breath and things resynchronized with my diaphragm, my neurology, then I caught my breath. I’m like, “Oh thank God.” And then the next thing I did without thinking, I saw that my shoulder had dislocated. I literally just grabbed it and shoved it right in. I think the adrenaline was so strong coursing through my blood because I have dislocated my shoulder prior to that in skateboarding, and you can’t do that. You cannot just.

Michael:

No.

Titus Chiu:

But somehow I was able to do it just through the sheer adrenaline.

Michael:

And skateboarding injuries are gnarly. I was the kid on rollerblades with the skateboarders. I would try to do the tricks on the rollerblades that they were doing on the boards, until I watched my friend get a compound fracture of his clavicle through the skin. It was visible. And I was like, “Oh, I quit this.”

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, okay. A little bit too-

Michael:

Yeah.

Titus Chiu:

… too graphic for my tastes.

Michael:

So wait, you said something. That you lost control. Is that what happens when you get the wind knocked out of you is you lose control of the diaphragm?

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, there’s a whole synchrony. It’s like imagine the diaphragm’s a muscle, right, so you lose that coordination with the diaphragm.

Michael:

And then you can’t work it.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, exactly. And I’m sure there’s a lot going on.

Michael:

I’ve always wondered, but I didn’t know what actually happens when that happens. That makes sense.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, just like hiccups, it’s like a terrible big hiccup when you lose the synchrony between your diaphragm, your phrenic nerve, your vagus nerve.

Michael:

Oh, no thank you. I’ll be good letting that memory fade and never going through that again. That’s fine. So then the paramedic people came, and you told them, “I dislocated my shoulder and I fixed it.”

Titus Chiu:

What’s actually kind of hilarious, so the lady that hit me, she was this older Japanese, I think she was a grandma or something. Right? She comes running over. Right? And she’s just scared. She’s like, “Oh my God,” as I can imagine I just hit this guy and he’s on the ground. And when I was doing, you know, when we do this like call an ambulance.

Michael:

Yeah, yeah.

Titus Chiu:

So I was like still winded. I’m like, “Call an ambulance. Call an ambulance.” Right? Because I can feel the pain and everything.

Michael:

Yeah.

Titus Chiu:

Well they call an ambulance, and she looks at me. Her eyes get super wide, and she runs away. I’m like, “Are you serious?” She just ran away. And then so eventually I think someone, it was in front of a car dealership. They called an ambulance, comes get me. Right? And I go to the ER. They check me out. They check that everything, they find broken ribs, but then they let me off. Right? They let me go.

Titus Chiu:

She actually then, her husband was a doctor. They somehow got my contact information, and they contacted me. They were like, “We’d like to take care of things. We don’t want to have to go to court. Let’s settle out of court.” And so I went at that time with a friend of mine to dinner with them.

Titus Chiu:

So it’s me, my friend, this lady, and her husband. And we’re all having dinner. And she was telling me, she’s like, “You know, when I first saw you, I thought you hit your head and went crazy,” because she thought I was Japanese. Right? So number one, they don’t make these hand signals like call.

Michael:

One, you were speaking English.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, I’m screaming English. I’m making these crazy arm movements that have no meaning in the Japanese vocabulary. She thought I was Japanese. She thought I was shouting mumbo jumbo after I got in that car. She got terrified. She was like, “Oh my God.” So she ran away because she thought I was had gone totally bonkers.

Michael:

That’s really nice that they reached out though and wanted to-

Titus Chiu:

Oh yeah, no, she was just so scared something terrible had happened.

Michael:

I can’t imagine that happening here.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, no, they were really nice. I remember he again, he was a medical doctor, so he came over to my apartment once, rang the bell. I remember I was still wearing this… Obviously when you break your ribs there’s no cast, but it was-

Michael:

Yeah, and that sucks too. I’ve done that before. Breathing, coughing, sneezing, laughing.

Titus Chiu:

You can’t laugh.

Michael:

You can’t laugh. Yeah.

Titus Chiu:

That was my only salvation was laughter then.

Michael:

And it’s not worth it. It’s like six weeks and there’s nothing you can do.

Titus Chiu:

I know, it’s terrible. Well, there actually is now-

Michael:

Oh really?

Titus Chiu:

… that I’ve gone through it. Yeah, there’s low-level laser. There’s muscle-

Michael:

Oh, yeah, I just meant they don’t put. There’s no cast or brace or thing.

Titus Chiu:

There’s a lot you can do.

Michael:

But laser, yeah.

Titus Chiu:

So he came over, and he brought pain medication. He didn’t have to. You know? So they were really kind. They were really nice, but I just thought that was so hilarious because she thought-

Michael:

She thought you lost your mind. Yeah.

Titus Chiu:

She said she was like, which is funny.

Michael:

I broke this man.

Titus Chiu:

Now that I’m thinking about it, that was actually an omen foreboding of what was to come after my concussion when I hit rock bottom.

Michael:

That’s a crazy experience. It’s so different culturally too. I can’t imagine something like that happening here. Somebody hits you on a motorcycle and then they reach out to you.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, they reached out.

Michael:

And the guy’s a doctor, comes to you house, take you to dinner.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, they were so-

Michael:

More like talk to my lawyer.

Titus Chiu:

… so sweet. Yeah. And just on another note, I remember I lost my wallet there once on the train. Somebody mailed it to the police office, and they contacted me, and I got my wallet back. I was just like, “What?”

Michael:

Wow.

Titus Chiu:

And another story on that note, I remember my mom and my aunt came to visit me. And they don’t really tip out there. Right? When you go to the restaurant. So my mom and my aunt, they leave a tip. My mom was telling me this story afterwards, she was like, “They ran after me a block or two-

Michael:

To give her the extra money?

Titus Chiu:

Yeah. Really amazing, amazing. It was an amazing experience.

Michael:

Minus the getting crushed on a scooter thing.

Titus Chiu:

But honestly, Michael, when I-

Michael:

That’s true.

Titus Chiu:

That’s the first big adjustment I had. Right now, it’s just… At the time when I was in pain and I couldn’t do the things I loved, yeah, it sucked. I’ll be fully honest. But looking back on it, I firmly see that as yeah, it was one of the best things that ever happened to me. It just completely… I wouldn’t be here talking to you on so many levels.

Michael:

Yeah, it’s easy to say that from our perspective here after you’ve been through it.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah.

Michael:

That you can see it because when you see the 30,000 foot view of it later, it’s like oh that happened, which made this happen, so I did that, which led to this, which brought me here, so now I’m doing this. None of this, it’s like a domino effect, it wouldn’t happen. But I remember people telling me that when I was in some of the darkest parts, being like, “Oh, this is all for a reason, and there’s a gift here, and you’re going to come out of this better.” I wanted them all to die. I was just like, “Shut up. I don’t want to hear any of this. I want what I’m going through right now to stop.”

Titus Chiu:

Exactly.

Michael:

And so I get it. If you hear us say that, that this is the trajectory changer, and I can say the same thing about my story too about I can identify these periods and being like, “Man, that really sucked, and it made me get through that to get to this, to come here, to do this.” But the me then wouldn’t want to hear that from the me now.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah.

Michael:

So if you’re in that spot, I totally get it.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, exactly. That’s what I’m saying. It’s like keep going through that. Depending on where you’re at in that journey, I’ve learned when I’m talking to my patients or my clients or I’m teaching my students, it’s really important to understand, and for me to remember what I was dealing with at the time. And it wasn’t pleasant.

Michael:

Yeah.

Titus Chiu:

There’s that saying if you have an arrow sticking out of your chest, you don’t want to philosophize about the meaning of life. You want to get rid of that arrow and get rid of that pain as soon as possible. And so I completely… When I say that it was the best thing that happened to me, it really was. That’s me speaking authentically.

Michael:

Yeah.

Titus Chiu:

At the time, it definitely sucked, and I definitely did not want it to have happened to me.

Michael:

Yeah, it’s the best things that I’ve ever done that I would never sign up to do again.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah, exactly. Absolutely.

Michael:

So cool. Well thanks for sharing all the story. It’s so interesting for me to learn about because I’ve interviewed you, and we’ve done presentations and a workshop series, and a lot of the guests on this season I’ve interacted with them or engaged with them in some way professionally where it’s been them being a doctor and teaching something or something of that nature, and it’s not so often I get to actually have conversations that are how’d you get to be doing this. And everyone has a story. There’s no one that just randomly one day was like, “I’m going to be a health practitioner. I’m going to be a doctor. I’m going to be this.” I don’t think that just drops into someone’s head. That it’s almost always has to be this event or crisis or disease or pain or illness or something that steers the direction towards that.

Michael:

But then what you just mentioned, it provides the ability to relate and to see people and to have empathy for where they’re at. And not be preachy. Now I look back at how I would drop 100 things on a person who’s in a health crisis to do, and I’m like oh man, that was really tone deaf. That’s really not… Because then they’ll stress over it. I can’t do this, and I can’t do that. And it’s a whole other thing.

Michael:

And I think having now that I’ve been through the ringer because mine came after I started doing that kind of work. My crisis came after I started working with clients and stuff. And then I realized what I had been doing. It was like, wow, I need to really be able to meet people where they are.

Titus Chiu:

Totally. That’s so important. That’s the most important thing because I had a similar experience going through it and just falling in love with neurology and functional medicine and all this stuff. I was so excited I’d go back to my practice and be like, “Hey, there’s all this stuff.” And they’d be like, their eyes would get glazed over and like eh.

Michael:

Yeah.

Titus Chiu:

They just want to feel better.

Michael:

Yeah.

Titus Chiu:

And totally I can relate to that professionally but also very much so personally.

Michael:

For sure. So thank you for sharing all this. I’m really happy you got hit by that car. And so many go pro kind of thing. You have a really cool helmet video. But it sucks that the things have to happen that have to happen to get us onto the paths that we end up on. And I’m grateful for mine.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah.

Michael:

It’s like a love-hate-love, grateful, don’t want to do it again, no thank you, but thank you.

Titus Chiu:

Yeah.

Michael:

But now, I’m trying to be able to make adjustments and course corrections and learn lessons without them having to be like that.

Titus Chiu:

Exactly.

Michael:

Is kind of my goal now. And I’m sure that’ll happen again. I’m sure there will be another period of time where here’s a sharp course correction, but I’m grateful for the experiences. And thanks for sharing yours. I think a lot of people out there will be able to relate. I’m glad those things happened the way that they did because it led you to be doing what you’re doing now, which is helping tons of people, and it’s lots of fun, and I’ve really enjoyed working with you. So just thanks. Thanks for sharing and for doing what you’re doing.

Titus Chiu:

Absolutely, yeah. It was great chatting with you, Michael.

Michael:

All right.

Michael:

And this brings us to the end of today’s episode. Head on over to rebelhealthtribe.com/kit to access the RHT quick start bundle, which includes four full length presentations from our RHT masterclasses, two downloadable PDF guides, and a 15% coupon, which you can use in our retail shop. If you’re on Facebook, come join our Rebel Health Tribe group over there. And finally, if you like this show, please subscribe, leave a review, and share it with your friends. Thanks for joining us. We’ll see you again soon.